Bug out bags

Thoughts, suggestions, and advice on what to do if the unthinkable happens.
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Dixon
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Location: Alberta Canada

Mon Oct 17, 2016 2:42 am

I've been creating a bug out bag for myself, is there anything you guys would suggest I put in the bag?

In terms of medical supplies, what should I stock up on/buy in bulk? If I get a lot of it, what would happen to it if the bag were to be flooded? Would everything be salvageable?

Is there a specific place or brand of food rations I should buy? How do I ration my food?

Where should I buy seeds? Is it difficult to store?

If I have a car, what types of tools should I be putting into it? Tools to repair, build and maintain things.

Besides improving my basic Medical skills what should I improve on to help myself in whatever situation may arise. I.e Hunting, Fishing, Shooting, Building, Repairing, Farming, all of the above? What should I focus on?
Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
- Blaise Pascal

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Harbinger
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Mon Oct 17, 2016 6:11 pm

Dixon wrote:I've been creating a bug out bag for myself, is there anything you guys would suggest I put in the bag?

In terms of medical supplies, what should I stock up on/buy in bulk? If I get a lot of it, what would happen to it if the bag were to be flooded? Would everything be salvageable?

Is there a specific place or brand of food rations I should buy? How do I ration my food?

Where should I buy seeds? Is it difficult to store?

If I have a car, what types of tools should I be putting into it? Tools to repair, build and maintain things.

Besides improving my basic Medical skills what should I improve on to help myself in whatever situation may arise. I.e Hunting, Fishing, Shooting, Building, Repairing, Farming, all of the above? What should I focus on?
I think it would be relevant to ask a few general questions first:
1. Where do you live? A BoB for a rural Montana resident should be very different from one for a NYC resident.
2. Where do you plan to go? Are you going to a relative or friends house, or are you going to attempt <--(key word) to live off the land?
3. What are you preparing for? Major hurricane? Pandemic? Nuclear War?
Pro Patria Vigilans

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RiffRaff
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Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:10 pm

Keep in mind that in most circles, a "bug out bag" is a backpack or duffel that can easily be carried on foot and contains the bare minimum supplies for 72 hours of survival. It seems you're talking more about being able to "bug out" for a long duration. So in addition to the questions asked by Harbinger, we also need to know more about your definition of "bug out."
"It's in your nature to destroy yourselves." - Terminator 2: Judgment Day

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Dixon
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Joined: Tue Feb 02, 2016 3:18 am
Location: Alberta Canada

Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:17 pm

Harbinger wrote:
Dixon wrote:I've been creating a bug out bag for myself, is there anything you guys would suggest I put in the bag?

In terms of medical supplies, what should I stock up on/buy in bulk? If I get a lot of it, what would happen to it if the bag were to be flooded? Would everything be salvageable?

Is there a specific place or brand of food rations I should buy? How do I ration my food?

Where should I buy seeds? Is it difficult to store?

If I have a car, what types of tools should I be putting into it? Tools to repair, build and maintain things.

Besides improving my basic Medical skills what should I improve on to help myself in whatever situation may arise. I.e Hunting, Fishing, Shooting, Building, Repairing, Farming, all of the above? What should I focus on?
I think it would be relevant to ask a few general questions first:
1. Where do you live? A BoB for a rural Montana resident should be very different from one for a NYC resident.
2. Where do you plan to go? Are you going to a relative or friends house, or are you going to attempt <--(key word) to live off the land?
3. What are you preparing for? Major hurricane? Pandemic? Nuclear War?
1. Currently living in Edmonton, but if I can continue to save money I will be on the move, traveling around the west coast, probably following the North American Cordillera.

2. With that plan it would depend on where I am at that moment. If I was still in Canada I would move either Northwest or move Northeast along the mountains. When in America though, I really got no clue where I would go. Probably not central america, try and stay on the coast trying to keep my eyes open for freighters or any ships. But yes, for the most part live off the land.

3. There are just so many scenarios to choose from.. Ideally just a EMP goes of somewhere and takes out all electricity, loss of reliable communication, forcing citys outside the coast to fend for themselves. Just no matter where I am at the moment everything goes down I want to be ready for it. If I'm a highway in the middle of no where then it happens, yelp guess I'll have to find out if its worth staying here or keep trying to move on.
Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
- Blaise Pascal

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Dixon
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Location: Alberta Canada

Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:25 pm

RiffRaff wrote:Keep in mind that in most circles, a "bug out bag" is a backpack or duffel that can easily be carried on foot and contains the bare minimum supplies for 72 hours of survival. It seems you're talking more about being able to "bug out" for a long duration. So in addition to the questions asked by Harbinger, we also need to know more about your definition of "bug out."
Well I guess then it comes down to what do I need to have to be prepared. I want to store the stuff in a small bag, large bag, and a car. Small bag I guess would have the bare essentials, large bag and car would just store some of it in bulk, but I don't know what I would need to store in bulk.
Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
- Blaise Pascal

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RiffRaff
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Tue Oct 18, 2016 2:02 am

Dixon wrote:
RiffRaff wrote:Keep in mind that in most circles, a "bug out bag" is a backpack or duffel that can easily be carried on foot and contains the bare minimum supplies for 72 hours of survival. It seems you're talking more about being able to "bug out" for a long duration. So in addition to the questions asked by Harbinger, we also need to know more about your definition of "bug out."
Well I guess then it comes down to what do I need to have to be prepared. I want to store the stuff in a small bag, large bag, and a car. Small bag I guess would have the bare essentials, large bag and car would just store some of it in bulk, but I don't know what I would need to store in bulk.
Well, the basic requirements for survival are:

1: Water
2: Food
3: Shelter
4: Security

Usually in that order, but in extreme weather climates shelter moves higher up the list. You get the idea.

Water:
You need potable water, 1 gallon per person per day.
Military style canteens and/or other portable water storage is best for backpacks.
Water purification tablets are a good thing to keep with you.
A Life Straw is a good investment as well.
For the car you can store water in larger containers. Add bleach (2 drops per gallon) and rotate the water on a regular basis.

Food:
Non-perishable, high-protein food that is small and light and can be consumed while on the move without cooking.
Breakfast bars, beef jerky, trail mix, dried fruit, peanut butter & crackers, honey, etc.
For larger bags and car you can add in canned foods and food that needs prep time or cooking.

Shelter:
A "space blanket" is compact and light.
A small single person tent can also be carried with most backpacks.
A small tarp can be utilized as a makeshift shelter in place of a tent.

Security:
Flashlights are a must. Small LED "tactical" flashlights are good. Also consider a head lamp version.
Glow sticks are good in some situations.
Waterproof matches and candles are a good addition as well.
First aid supplies are a must.
A good solid knife is also a must, but type is highly dependent on personal preference. I prefer the Bowie style knife with a hollow handle, but the KA-Bar is very popular for this purpose too.
A multi-tool such as a Leatherman is an excellent item to carry as well.
As for firearms, I leave that completely up to the individual, but keep in mind weight, portability, and the weight of extra ammunition.

Prepare for the worst-case scenario where you will have to carry everything with you on foot. Any situation better than that is a luxury, and possibly a temporary luxury at that.
"It's in your nature to destroy yourselves." - Terminator 2: Judgment Day

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Dixon
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Location: Alberta Canada

Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:00 am

RiffRaff wrote:
Water:
You need potable water, 1 gallon per person per day.
Military style canteens and/or other portable water storage is best for backpacks.
Water purification tablets are a good thing to keep with you.
A Life Straw is a good investment as well.
For the car you can store water in larger containers. Add bleach (2 drops per gallon) and rotate the water on a regular basis.

Food:
Non-perishable, high-protein food that is small and light and can be consumed while on the move without cooking.
Breakfast bars, beef jerky, trail mix, dried fruit, peanut butter & crackers, honey, etc.
For larger bags and car you can add in canned foods and food that needs prep time or cooking.
I don't own a car, so when I do should I just buy a truck and throw a large water tank in the back? If I plan on driving a lot would having the thing full all the time be a good idea? Form there it seems like I see what I need to get. And I just looked at the life straw and I guess you've sold me on it.
Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
- Blaise Pascal

hrng
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Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:15 am

Dixon wrote:I don't own a car, so when I do should I just buy a truck and throw a large water tank in the back? If I plan on driving a lot would having the thing full all the time be a good idea? Form there it seems like I see what I need to get. And I just looked at the life straw and I guess you've sold me on it.
The key word is potable... water sitting in a tank in the back of a truck will degrade pretty quick unless it's regularly cycled. Added weight means more fuel, and unless you do it right, it could be a roll hazard. It's hard to give specific advice without knowing your exact circumstances, you'll need to think about where you're going to be and what kind of water access you're going to have on the road. It's a lot easier to carry purification supplies than a big tank.
It is easier to carry an empty cup
than one that is filled to the brim.

The sharper the blade
the easier it is to dull.

The more wealth you possess
the more insecurity it brings.

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Dixon
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Location: Alberta Canada

Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:30 am

hrng wrote:
Dixon wrote:I don't own a car, so when I do should I just buy a truck and throw a large water tank in the back? If I plan on driving a lot would having the thing full all the time be a good idea? Form there it seems like I see what I need to get. And I just looked at the life straw and I guess you've sold me on it.
The key word is potable... water sitting in a tank in the back of a truck will degrade pretty quick unless it's regularly cycled. Added weight means more fuel, and unless you do it right, it could be a roll hazard. It's hard to give specific advice without knowing your exact circumstances, you'll need to think about where you're going to be and what kind of water access you're going to have on the road. It's a lot easier to carry purification supplies than a big tank.
It is easier to carry an empty cup
than one that is filled to the brim.

The sharper the blade
the easier it is to dull.

The more wealth you possess
the more insecurity it brings.
Okay then you make great points. How about water bags? I don't know.. buy a bunch of ziploc bags? Just have a few water jugs handy. Then like you said just have plenty of water purification supplies
Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
- Blaise Pascal

hrng
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Tue Oct 18, 2016 8:39 am

Dixon wrote:Okay then you make great points. How about water bags? I don't know.. buy a bunch of ziploc bags? Just have a few water jugs handy. Then like you said just have plenty of water purification supplies
You can get flat pack water "cubes" for pretty cheap, I've got a couple in a cupboard somewhere, they're not fun to fill up though. :D Something like this: http://www.gsioutdoors.com/15-l-water-cube.html

Personally I keep a crate of 600ml water bottles in the car. You're not supposed to around here because of the heat, but I cycle through them once a month or two which is short enough to prevent spoilage. If I've got an extra long trip planned I'll chuck a couple of 20L bottles in the back too, just in case. That's enough for drinking, and for fire protection a blanket and a rakehoe is all I need.

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