Transportation after Nuclear Annihilation

Thoughts, suggestions, and advice on what to do if the unthinkable happens.
Yingyang
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Posts: 553
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 1:12 am
Location: Perth Western Australia

Mon Feb 18, 2019 12:49 am

Obreid wrote:
Sun Feb 17, 2019 9:17 am
Not just surface winds either but also the jet stream which and large weather fronts
RiffRaff wrote:
Sun Dec 16, 2018 2:05 am
Yingyang wrote:
Sun Dec 16, 2018 12:40 am
Remember as soon as you believe a nuclear war is imminent hopefully through this site half an hour before any public announcement if any. Make sure to check wind direction , as this could greatly reduce immediate fallout and lower radiation poisoning. Otherwise you find your heading the same way. If blows the direction you want make detour, around 4- 500km is approximately the distance by wind. About 120km wide of this zone should be safer. A bee line to your destination could take you through the thick of it. Also if you live near city,fuel refinery-industrial area , international airport , military base or port-harbor bugging out is the realistic option. For me I have too get out as all of these basically surround me in a 20 to 30 km radius with a small window and luck has it wind direction rarely blows that way. With hills only 35km away topography can also play a big part.
We have a map in our emergency response plans that shows all potential detonation points between us and our bugout location, with a pre-planned route that avoids all interstates and major highways. We can be outside Indianapolis blast zones within 10 minutes of leaving the house. Now how much we have in the way of supplies transferred from the basement to the truck - that depends on whether or not we reached DEFCON 2 before we hit DEFCON 1. DEFCON 2 is when we load the truck up, ready to go. Depending on the scenario, we may head to one of our failsafe waypoints along our path that is well outside of any blast or fallout zones and see if it cools down or not.
Yes very true most wouldn't consider this.

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RiffRaff
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Mon Feb 18, 2019 8:16 am

Yingyang wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 12:49 am
Obreid wrote:
Sun Feb 17, 2019 9:17 am
Not just surface winds either but also the jet stream which and large weather fronts
Yes very true most wouldn't consider this.
That is a valid point, but I assume civilians would lose access to weather information and forecasts almost immediately during a nuclear exchange, especially the more advanced meteorological science like jet stream forecasts. If we've reached the point where I'm monitoring surface wind direction because there has been a detonation or detonations near me, I doubt the Internet is going to be working for me to check the jet stream.
"It's in your nature to destroy yourselves." - Terminator 2: Judgment Day

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