Emergency Readiness & Children

Thoughts, suggestions, and advice on what to do if the unthinkable happens.
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KimPossible
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Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:54 am

Emergency Readiness & Children
This article I put together I hope will help people in my situation. If you have children this article is for you and your children to know Emergency Readiness, (ages above 5 years old IMO). Sadly the event a parent's death during a disaster is a likely event we tend to not think about nor could imagine, and likely after a major disaster would leave many children alone and helpless after disasters & here is how to curve those odds for your child.


In any scenario Children should be taught how to determine whether Water is clean to drink, and how to filter water. Most know the human body can’t go without water for only a few days. So making sure your child knows how to determine whether water is safe to drink or not and how to filter water if it is not safe to drink means life or death.

Gather, hunting, and farming for Food. Most of us know the human body can only live for a little over a week with no food. For your children to know what to eat, what not to eat after a certain disaster, and obtaining food after disasters is a very critical thing to know.

Medicine should be obtained for children in stock for a half a year (IMO), such as any medical problems like inhalers, allergy medicine, epee pens. At least more then one of each stock of medicine should be kept on the child when departing from parent for any reasons. NOTE: that you should teach your child how to give themselves their own dosage of medicine without a adult around in case there isn’t one around to hand out medicine.

For your children to understand the importance of beingInconspicuous with information they know about you and your prepping. They will find it easy to tell their friends about the ginormous stock pile of food and supplies you have in basement. When hunger sets in all their friends and teachers will remember your child poking fun at you for storing food.

Weapons & children are sensitive subjects & is up to the parent on what he/she would like to teach their child about the use/practice, service of a weapon. To give you a idea on what I think is appropriate for a child I teach my 13 year old daughter how to shoot my Glock 22 & 23 in my backyard, she also knows how to load ammo, clean, and service my Glock 22 & 23. She is also taught in archery, and knows how to identify many other weapons. The knowledge use of weapons for her is HUNTING purposes, but also defense purpose as well.



NOTE: Please drop a comment on what you think or maybe things should be added, thanks for reading.
Last edited by KimPossible on Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:46 pm, edited 12 times in total.
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RiffRaff
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Sun Dec 24, 2017 2:08 pm

My wife and I do not have children, but we do have pets that are just as much a part of the family. Of course, you can't teach a pet how to filter water or shoot firearms, but the dog would be useful in hunting, protection, and an alarm system. Unfortunately, if you are trying to hide in a concealed shelter a dog can also give away your position. The cat? Well, beyond pest control, the cat doesn't serve much purpose in a post-apocalyptic world. We do store dog food and cat food along with our own food in our shelter, but once that's gone, the pets potentially become more of a liability than an asset. We have had some tough talks on what we would do with them if it came to that, or if we had to bug out, which leaves very little room for a 100-pound giant malamute once the water, food, and fuel are loaded.

Unfortunately, children under the age of say, 4, are also going to be more of a liability than an asset in a SHTF scenario. I'm glad I don't have to deal with those choices.
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Librarylady
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Sun Dec 24, 2017 3:29 pm

I obsess about this endlessly! My 9 year old knows we have food stores but I've realized that I still have to teach him how to use a can opener (i plan to do this ASAP). Other than that I'm just not sure what else to do. My main concern is my older son (11) who is autistic and developmentally delayed. If something happens to me and my husband it's going to be up to my younger son to look after both himself and his brother (and the pets --but much as I love my pets they come a way distant second after my kids in this scenario). My elderly, visually-impaired mother lives with us, too, but I don't imagine she would long survive a major crisis due to age and poor health so I don't think think she could take care of the kids.

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KimPossible
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Sun Dec 24, 2017 6:37 pm

RiffRaff wrote:
Sun Dec 24, 2017 2:08 pm
My wife and I do not have children, but we do have pets that are just as much a part of the family. Of course, you can't teach a pet how to filter water or shoot firearms, but the dog would be useful in hunting, protection, and an alarm system. Unfortunately, if you are trying to hide in a concealed shelter a dog can also give away your position. The cat? Well, beyond pest control, the cat doesn't serve much purpose in a post-apocalyptic world. We do store dog food and cat food along with our own food in our shelter, but once that's gone, the pets potentially become more of a liability than an asset. We have had some tough talks on what we would do with them if it came to that, or if we had to bug out, which leaves very little room for a 100-pound giant malamute once the water, food, and fuel are loaded.

Unfortunately, children under the age of say, 4, are also going to be more of a liability than an asset in a SHTF scenario. I'm glad I don't have to deal with those choices.
Pets are a liability and my plan is to eat them once food rations runout. Luckily my children are above 4 years old. Still I wonder on a daily what I should tell them and teach them. Or if there at school and god for bid I don't make it, did I teach my children enough to make it on there own...
Librarylady wrote:
Sun Dec 24, 2017 3:29 pm
I obsess about this endlessly! My 9 year old knows we have food stores but I've realized that I still have to teach him how to use a can opener (i plan to do this ASAP). Other than that I'm just not sure what else to do. My main concern is my older son (11) who is autistic and developmentally delayed. If something happens to me and my husband it's going to be up to my younger son to look after both himself and his brother (and the pets --but much as I love my pets they come a way distant second after my kids in this scenario). My elderly, visually-impaired mother lives with us, too, but I don't imagine she would long survive a major crisis due to age and poor health so I don't think think she could take care of the kids.
Exactly my point and reason why I posted this thread. Its not often told or talked aalbout what to do with your own children when SHTF...

Do you have friends close or neighbours you trust? Could set up a backup plan in case you are not home for a friend or neighbours to take your children in the event SHTF?
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Obreid
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Tue Dec 26, 2017 4:06 am

On the topic of children another thing to consider is finding away to impress upon them the importance of not talking about the "preps" you are making at home. They will find it easy to tell their friends about the ginormous stock pile of food and supplies you have in basement.
When hunger sets in all their friends and teachers will remember your child poking fun at you for storing food.

Don't forget to teach them about water safety. Digestive issues can kill more children than most anything.

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KimPossible
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Tue Dec 26, 2017 5:15 am

Obreid wrote:
Tue Dec 26, 2017 4:06 am
On the topic of children another thing to consider is finding away to impress upon them the importance of not talking about the "preps" you are making at home. They will find it easy to tell their friends about the ginormous stock pile of food and supplies you have in basement.
When hunger sets in all their friends and teachers will remember your child poking fun at you for storing food.

Don't forget to teach them about water safety. Digestive issues can kill more children than most anything.
Very useful and thoughtful information adding it to the head of this thread thank you.
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Tue Dec 26, 2017 7:59 pm

Obreid wrote:
Tue Dec 26, 2017 4:06 am
On the topic of children another thing to consider is finding away to impress upon them the importance of not talking about the "preps" you are making at home.
This is more important than most people realize.

After a disaster, you'll be surprised how many people will remember an off-comment about the stockpile you have.

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